Diwali or Dipavali: Unraveling the Festive Legends

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Diwali or Dipavali: Unraveling the Festive Legends

Diwali is a Hindi word, the Sanskrit word is Dipavali means row of lights.

Diwali, also known as the festival of lights, is one of the most popular festivals celebrated in India and across the world. The festival signifies the victory of good over evil and is celebrated with great enthusiasm and zeal. The festival is celebrated for five days and is associated with numerous legends and myths. In this article, we will unravel the festive legends associated with Diwali.

Diwali: The Festival of Lights and Legends

Diwali, the festival of lights, is celebrated in different parts of India with great pomp and show. The festival is celebrated to welcome Lord Rama, who returned to Ayodhya after defeating the demon king Ravana. The festival is celebrated by lighting diyas, decorating houses with lights, and bursting firecrackers. It is believed that the lights signify the victory of good over evil and the triumph of light over darkness.

The Myths and Stories Behind Diwali Celebrations

There are many legends associated with Diwali celebrations, and here are a few of them:

  1. The Legend of Lord Rama: According to Hindu mythology, Lord Rama returned to Ayodhya after defeating Ravana, the demon king of Lanka. The people of Ayodhya welcomed him by lighting diyas, decorating the city with lights, and bursting firecrackers. The tradition continues to date, and people celebrate Diwali to commemorate the triumph of good over evil.
  2. The Legend of Goddess Lakshmi: It is believed that Goddess Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth and prosperity, visits homes that are clean and well-lit on the day of Diwali. People light diyas and decorate their homes to welcome the goddess and seek her blessings.
  3. The Legend of Narakasura: According to Hindu mythology, Narakasura, the demon king, was killed by Lord Krishna on the day of Diwali. The victory of Lord Krishna over Narakasura symbolizes the triumph of good over evil.
  4. The Legend of King Bali: It is believed that King Bali, an asura king, was defeated by Lord Vishnu and sent to the underworld. On the day of Diwali, it is believed that King Bali returns to the earth to grant blessings to his people.
  5. The Legend of Mahavira: Jains celebrate Diwali to commemorate the attainment of nirvana by Mahavira, the last Tirthankara.

In conclusion, Diwali is a festival that is associated with numerous legends and myths. The festival signifies the victory of good over evil and is celebrated with great enthusiasm and zeal. The festival is an occasion to celebrate with friends and family and seek the blessings of the gods.

Diwali in India